Time crunched training

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

mrgray wrote:when you say decoupling do you mean a HR which won't rise, despite one feeling like they are well and truly on the ragged edge?
Listen to Fast Talk, ep. 4: The myth of the useless heart rate monitor by VeloNews #np on #SoundCloud
https://soundcloud.com/user-562497687/f ... te-monitor

There is another one I'll find tomorrow


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Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
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Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

Listen to Fast Talk, ep. 19: Training as a numbers game by VeloNews #np on #SoundCloud
https://soundcloud.com/user-562497687/f ... -your-ride

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mrgray
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by mrgray

thanks i will have a look
Bobo S&S Steel Bike - 7.5 kg
Oltre XR2- 6.6 kg
Look 585 - 6.8 kg
Look 695 SR :D

AJS914
Posts: 5498
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

I was reading this topic and looking at the plan tapeworm sketched out:
Day 1: [4x30sec efforts ON/30 sec off] x 2, minimum 10mins recovery.
Day 2: 2x20min efforts at TT pace, minimum 10mins recovery in between.
Day 3: Long very easy ride.
Day 4: 5x5mins @ TT pace +5-10%, 1 mins rest between efforts.
Day 5: Long easy ride (plus 4x sprints if you need it).
Day 6: Very long ride (~4hrs)
Day 7: Rest

BTW, I'm also reading Carmichael's Time Crunched book for ideas.

Basically, I have almost unlimited time to train but I really don't want to be on the bike that much. The 6-8 hours is perfect. I might hit 9 or 10 hours on some big weeks in the summer.

Anyway, my question is whether people find they recover enough to train 6 days a week. I edged towards burnout late this summer after my riding time and intensity ramped up. I'm also 52 years old and don't have the same energy that I did when 25. I don't race anymore but I do a fast paced group ride every weekend .

I was thinking that if I'm going to typically ride 100-150 miles per week, it would be better to do it over 3 or 4 days with full days of rest in between rather than doing shorter rides over 5-6 days. What do people think? My weekend group ride is around 45 miles in the winter and 50-60 in the summer.

crazy brit
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:20 pm
Location: Montreal, Canada.

by crazy brit

AJS914 wrote:
Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:45 pm
I was reading this topic and looking at the plan tapeworm sketched out:
Day 1: [4x30sec efforts ON/30 sec off] x 2, minimum 10mins recovery.
Day 2: 2x20min efforts at TT pace, minimum 10mins recovery in between.
Day 3: Long very easy ride.
Day 4: 5x5mins @ TT pace +5-10%, 1 mins rest between efforts.
Day 5: Long easy ride (plus 4x sprints if you need it).
Day 6: Very long ride (~4hrs)
Day 7: Rest

BTW, I'm also reading Carmichael's Time Crunched book for ideas.

Basically, I have almost unlimited time to train but I really don't want to be on the bike that much. The 6-8 hours is perfect. I might hit 9 or 10 hours on some big weeks in the summer.

Anyway, my question is whether people find they recover enough to train 6 days a week. I edged towards burnout late this summer after my riding time and intensity ramped up. I'm also 52 years old and don't have the same energy that I did when 25. I don't race anymore but I do a fast paced group ride every weekend .

I was thinking that if I'm going to typically ride 100-150 miles per week, it would be better to do it over 3 or 4 days with full days of rest in between rather than doing shorter rides over 5-6 days. What do people think? My weekend group ride is around 45 miles in the winter and 50-60 in the summer.
I'm in a similar boat (45, maybe around 6-8 hrs/week available to train). I know myself well enough by now that 6 days a week is just no go from a recovery perspective, for me, YMMV. I find 3-4 times a week on the bike is perfect, it allows me to get quality workouts in and adequate recovery. On rest days I may/may not do some light running or core work to complement the on-bike training but nothing hard. This winter/spring i'm trying a program based loosely around the British Cycling program that's available online which seems to fit this bill nicely.

cheapvega
Posts: 476
Joined: Sun Oct 06, 2019 1:12 pm

by cheapvega

Any recommendations for someone with about 3-5 hours a week to train for rolling hills? My plan for now is 2 1hr sweet spot sessions and 1 hour session of hill repeats, and then whatever I can get on top of that. I know 3 hours isn't shit but that's my situation now. I've already given up 1 day in the gym to ride more which is all I can do

crazy brit
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:20 pm
Location: Montreal, Canada.

by crazy brit

cheapvega wrote:
Wed Sep 23, 2020 2:51 pm
Any recommendations for someone with about 3-5 hours a week to train for rolling hills? My plan for now is 2 1hr sweet spot sessions and 1 hour session of hill repeats, and then whatever I can get on top of that. I know 3 hours isn't shit but that's my situation now. I've already given up 1 day in the gym to ride more which is all I can do
Since my post above yours i've gone all in with TrainerRoad this year, I wanted a plan that would make the most the hours that I have available. Their Plan Builder feature is pretty impressive in that you can enter any events (incl. type, duration, priority) that you want to train for, your experience, hours available to train etc. and you get a fully mapped out training plan to suit. Obviously it's not free, but I think before you sign up (monthly/yearly) you can play with the plan builder to see what it offers. Their youtube podcasts are a mine of info also.
It's worked really well so far, my FTP is up around 10% and my 20 minute power has increased dramatically.

If you're looking for more general advice, workouts etc. i'm sure other folks can chime in.

kingshorthair
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2012 7:19 pm

by kingshorthair

Yep +1 for trainerroad. Their new adaptive training helps keep the progression going!

dhernan592
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2019 6:04 pm

by dhernan592

kingshorthair wrote:
Mon May 17, 2021 5:23 pm
Yep +1 for trainerroad. Their new adaptive training helps keep the progression going!
This. The one thing I don't like is the amount of interval training per week, very easy to cause burnout mentally and physically. But easy to fix by assessing completed or failed workout attempts

pkaro
Posts: 54
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2018 2:40 pm

by pkaro

Their AI FTP detection is also very impressive. From just doing endurance and sweet spot efforts it gave me an FTP of 333W. I then went out a week later and did a 20 minute all out effort. 95% of that resulted in 337W.

Depending on where you're starting from, you may need to manually find workouts which are challenging enough, the VO2 max level workouts at the lower levels are really a joke, imo. Only starting at level 7 do you get workouts like 4x4 at 120% (which is very tough workout, admittedly). Trainerroad's VO2max workouts also tend to go very much for short efforts (3 mins or lower), while many studies point to longer VO2 max intervals providing greater benefits than shorter intervals. Personally I find VO2 max thresholds very tough on the trainer - the trainer for me is best when doing long SS intervals (2 x 30, 3 x 20) in a 90 min sessions.

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