Yoeleo G21

The spirit of Grav-lo-cross. No but seriously, cyclocross and gravel go here!

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justkeepridin
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:08 am

by justkeepridin

Hello everyone,

I've been diving into the world of gravel biking recently and have come across the Yoeleo G21. It's caught my eye for a number of reasons, but as I'm still expanding my knowledge in the realm of gravel biking, I'd really appreciate some experienced perspectives.

https://www.yoeleobike.com/collections/ ... -frame-g21

From my understanding, the G21's optimized geometry, featuring a longer wheelbase, slack headtube angle, and shorter stem, seems promising for stability and comfort on diverse terrains. I've also read about its ability to accommodate tire sizes up to 53c, which appears to make it versatile for a variety of trails and conditions.

The G21's ProMoldCore technology and Yoeleo ProRoute System seem like solid advancements, offering a smoother internal surface, better cable routing, and overall gear shifting and braking improvements. Are these as impactful in practice as they sound on paper?

I'm particularly curious about the T47 threaded bottom bracket. How much of a difference does this make in bike stiffness and maintenance compared to traditional press-fit brackets?

Also, it seems the G21 has been designed with bikepacking in mind, with its multiple mounting points. Is this bike a good option for someone planning to do both day-trips and longer, multi-day treks?

Finally, Yoeleo's 6-year warranty on the frameset and handlebars, along with the optional lifetime warranty, certainly seems reassuring. Have any of you had experience with their customer service, particularly in the event of a mishap?

In general, do you think the Yoeleo G21 is a worthy investment for someone looking to get more serious about gravel biking? I'm all ears for any insights, advice, or alternative recommendations.

Thanks in advance for your help!


atomiccow
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon May 09, 2022 2:33 pm

by atomiccow

I thought about it because of the appealing price and generally favorable comments about Yoeleo's quality, but decided against it. Ultimately the bike looks too strange to me with that extremely short headtube. Seems like they could have sloped the top tube a lot more. A short headtube just means you need more spacers, which is uglier, and you get an overall less rigid system. Not to mention this is an internally routed headset so you have large-diameter, thin bearings at either end of the headtube.

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justkeepridin
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:08 am

by justkeepridin

atomiccow wrote:
Wed May 31, 2023 11:28 pm
I thought about it because of the appealing price and generally favorable comments about Yoeleo's quality, but decided against it. Ultimately the bike looks too strange to me with that extremely short headtube. Seems like they could have sloped the top tube a lot more. A short headtube just means you need more spacers, which is uglier, and you get an overall less rigid system. Not to mention this is an internally routed headset so you have large-diameter, thin bearings at either end of the headtube.
I totally get where you're coming from about the headtube. I guess it's a bit like Marmite, you either love it or you hate it, right? but so far what i can see from YouTube it seems alright.



the one on their website is short i noticed.

Image

For me though, I'm really liking the idea of the higher top tube. for bikepacking having that extra space for a frame bag is a game changer, especially when you dont have sacrifice space for the bottle (full size). More room for snacks and the essentials - what's not to love? :D

not sure for the headset bearing, since i dont know exacly how is it, but a good point there. as for now i really want a full internal cable routing bike.

wickedsixx
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2021 7:50 am

by wickedsixx

Hi!
I just built up my G21 with T47 BB (the latest version).

First ride experience is the bike is very stable and comfortable. I'm running some great farsports gravel wheels that I now perform really well but with this setup (7.9kg with pedals) it doesn't feel as responsive as I prefer as a roadie. It's more comfort oriented than racing oriented I guess you could say.

Build quality is top notch, haven't seen a finish this proper even on my S-works frames. For example the brake mounts are completely flat which means I managed to set up the disc brakes perfectly on the first attempt with no issues with rubbing due to poor alignment. Compared to my Open Up this is worlds apart in terms of finish.

I've ridden many carbon frames, both S-works roadies to a couple of Gravel and CX bikes from Chinese brands from the likes of Twitter and Dengfu.
For comparison my Open UP is still my favourite in terms of responsiveness and light-footedness, and the Twitter Gravel V3 actually so far takes second place in terms of liveliness, which was a big sursprise given the price and finish. The Twitter is really messy internally and quite chunky. Yet despite being more than 0.5kg heavier it still feels a bit more fun to me. But that's just me, I prefer my gravel bike to feel and perform similar to a road bike, and in that regard the G21 just don't feel lively enough. It's a bit of a sursprise for me given how well built it is, but I guess they had different goals in mind when designing it.

Is the G21 any good then? Well it depends on what you want, if you want a stable do it all gravel muncher, it's perfect with its 53c tyre clearance. If you do however prefer something more snappy and fun I'd say no, this isn't the bike you're looking for. A shame really given its such a beautiful build in all other regards, the internals are spotless, just as nice as the exterior and the whole customer experience is great when it comes to unboxing, loads of spares and small pieces. The low was the shipping time, I ordered my frame late july 2022 and it arrived about a week ago, late may 2023. They've been fairly transparent about it but kept postponing the leadtimes, citing Covid19 delays and new iterations of the frame as causes, I could live with that. However as I wanted more of a race-oriented gravel bike, for me it wasn't really worth it. Sad to say. I'm yet to try it out a bit more on the loose stuff but I'm pretty sure my first impression will hold.

Cheers.

justkeepridin
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:08 am

by justkeepridin

wickedsixx wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 10:51 am
Hi!
I just built up my G21 with T47 BB (the latest version).

First ride experience is the bike is very stable and comfortable. I'm running some great farsports gravel wheels that I now perform really well but with this setup (7.9kg with pedals) it doesn't feel as responsive as I prefer as a roadie. It's more comfort oriented than racing oriented I guess you could say.

Build quality is top notch, haven't seen a finish this proper even on my S-works frames. For example the brake mounts are completely flat which means I managed to set up the disc brakes perfectly on the first attempt with no issues with rubbing due to poor alignment. Compared to my Open Up this is worlds apart in terms of finish.

I've ridden many carbon frames, both S-works roadies to a couple of Gravel and CX bikes from Chinese brands from the likes of Twitter and Dengfu.
For comparison my Open UP is still my favourite in terms of responsiveness and light-footedness, and the Twitter Gravel V3 actually so far takes second place in terms of liveliness, which was a big sursprise given the price and finish. The Twitter is really messy internally and quite chunky. Yet despite being more than 0.5kg heavier it still feels a bit more fun to me. But that's just me, I prefer my gravel bike to feel and perform similar to a road bike, and in that regard the G21 just don't feel lively enough. It's a bit of a sursprise for me given how well built it is, but I guess they had different goals in mind when designing it.

Is the G21 any good then? Well it depends on what you want, if you want a stable do it all gravel muncher, it's perfect with its 53c tyre clearance. If you do however prefer something more snappy and fun I'd say no, this isn't the bike you're looking for. A shame really given its such a beautiful build in all other regards, the internals are spotless, just as nice as the exterior and the whole customer experience is great when it comes to unboxing, loads of spares and small pieces. The low was the shipping time, I ordered my frame late july 2022 and it arrived about a week ago, late may 2023. They've been fairly transparent about it but kept postponing the leadtimes, citing Covid19 delays and new iterations of the frame as causes, I could live with that. However as I wanted more of a race-oriented gravel bike, for me it wasn't really worth it. Sad to say. I'm yet to try it out a bit more on the loose stuff but I'm pretty sure my first impression will hold.

Cheers.
Thanks so much for sharing your hands-on experience with the G21. It's incredibly helpful to hear from someone who's actually built and ridden the bike. Your feedback about the build quality and stability definitely backs up a lot of what I've been reading about the G21.

As for your point on the bike being more comfort-oriented than race-oriented, I've been mulling over that a bit. I'm actually looking for something that kind of bridges the gap between a gravel race and a bikepacking beast - something akin to the Canyon Grizl, but with full internal cabling, which is where the G21 with its ProRoute system shines.

It's a bit of a tall order, I know, but your review has given me more confidence that the G21 might just fit the bill for me. It's reassuring to hear your positive comments about the customer experience and the overall build quality, especially the clean internal routing.

Your feedback about the shipping time is also useful. It's definitely something to bear in mind if I decide to pull the trigger on the G21. are you purchasing directly from this link https://www.yoeleobike.com/collections/ ... -frame-g21 ?

Once again, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. And, if it's not too much trouble, could you share some pictures of your build? I'd love to see how it turned out!

Cheers,

wickedsixx
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2021 7:50 am

by wickedsixx

justkeepridin wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 2:00 pm

Thanks so much for sharing your hands-on experience with the G21. It's incredibly helpful to hear from someone who's actually built and ridden the bike. Your feedback about the build quality and stability definitely backs up a lot of what I've been reading about the G21.

As for your point on the bike being more comfort-oriented than race-oriented, I've been mulling over that a bit. I'm actually looking for something that kind of bridges the gap between a gravel race and a bikepacking beast - something akin to the Canyon Grizl, but with full internal cabling, which is where the G21 with its ProRoute system shines.

It's a bit of a tall order, I know, but your review has given me more confidence that the G21 might just fit the bill for me. It's reassuring to hear your positive comments about the customer experience and the overall build quality, especially the clean internal routing.

Your feedback about the shipping time is also useful. It's definitely something to bear in mind if I decide to pull the trigger on the G21. are you purchasing directly from this link https://www.yoeleobike.com/collections/ ... -frame-g21 ?

Once again, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. And, if it's not too much trouble, could you share some pictures of your build? I'd love to see how it turned out!

Cheers,
Hi again, no pictures yet but as far as aesthetics go its pretty neat.
I went on a long gravel ride this monday (135km) and I was quite dissatisfied to be honest. Here are my new findings:
  • 1. The handlebars are really stiff and transport a fair deal of vibrations into the hands on rougher terrain
  • 2. There is quite a lot of vertical feedback going up the seatpost as well, so much that it causes the rubber cover to be transported upward when riding
  • 3. The rear end is a fairly unresponsive, which is a affirmation of my previous post. I believe it's a combination of the longer chainstays and potentially a bit of flex
  • 4. The bike feels solid and predictable, handling is good, I find the front end very responsive and direct which is confidence inspiring
So to summarize, for me it felt like the frame was too stiff vertically causing hand pain and a quite uncomfortable ride, yet felt a bit heavy and unresponsive when putting the power down. Don't get me wrong, it's still perfectly finished, feels solid and all of the above, yet it certainly doesn't handle or respond like a high-end race-gravel bike, also the discomfort (especially in the handlebars) is very concerning.

I am going to experiment with my gearing a bit going forward and also try some bigger tyres as well as running lower pressures to see how it feels. So far though it feels a bit unbalanced with its responsive yet harsh cockpit and the slightly heavy and unresponsive rear end. But as I said I'm yet to experiment a bit more. So far however my 650USD Twitter Gravel bike feels a lot more responsive, comfortable and fun to ride, and that was just a fun and cheap project I did while waiting for my G21.

End note:
I imagine it still might work well as a bikepacking rig with fat tyres, where responsiveness is less important and where the fat tyres can soak up the road buzz.

Hope thats helpful.
Cheers

justkeepridin
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:08 am

by justkeepridin

wickedsixx wrote:
Sat Jun 10, 2023 1:57 pm
justkeepridin wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 2:00 pm

Thanks so much for sharing your hands-on experience with the G21. It's incredibly helpful to hear from someone who's actually built and ridden the bike. Your feedback about the build quality and stability definitely backs up a lot of what I've been reading about the G21.

As for your point on the bike being more comfort-oriented than race-oriented, I've been mulling over that a bit. I'm actually looking for something that kind of bridges the gap between a gravel race and a bikepacking beast - something akin to the Canyon Grizl, but with full internal cabling, which is where the G21 with its ProRoute system shines.

It's a bit of a tall order, I know, but your review has given me more confidence that the G21 might just fit the bill for me. It's reassuring to hear your positive comments about the customer experience and the overall build quality, especially the clean internal routing.

Your feedback about the shipping time is also useful. It's definitely something to bear in mind if I decide to pull the trigger on the G21. are you purchasing directly from this link https://www.yoeleobike.com/collections/ ... -frame-g21 ?

Once again, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. And, if it's not too much trouble, could you share some pictures of your build? I'd love to see how it turned out!

Cheers,
Hi again, no pictures yet but as far as aesthetics go its pretty neat.
I went on a long gravel ride this monday (135km) and I was quite dissatisfied to be honest. Here are my new findings:
  • 1. The handlebars are really stiff and transport a fair deal of vibrations into the hands on rougher terrain
  • 2. There is quite a lot of vertical feedback going up the seatpost as well, so much that it causes the rubber cover to be transported upward when riding
  • 3. The rear end is a fairly unresponsive, which is a affirmation of my previous post. I believe it's a combination of the longer chainstays and potentially a bit of flex
  • 4. The bike feels solid and predictable, handling is good, I find the front end very responsive and direct which is confidence inspiring
So to summarize, for me it felt like the frame was too stiff vertically causing hand pain and a quite uncomfortable ride, yet felt a bit heavy and unresponsive when putting the power down. Don't get me wrong, it's still perfectly finished, feels solid and all of the above, yet it certainly doesn't handle or respond like a high-end race-gravel bike, also the discomfort (especially in the handlebars) is very concerning.

I am going to experiment with my gearing a bit going forward and also try some bigger tyres as well as running lower pressures to see how it feels. So far though it feels a bit unbalanced with its responsive yet harsh cockpit and the slightly heavy and unresponsive rear end. But as I said I'm yet to experiment a bit more. So far however my 650USD Twitter Gravel bike feels a lot more responsive, comfortable and fun to ride, and that was just a fun and cheap project I did while waiting for my G21.

End note:
I imagine it still might work well as a bikepacking rig with fat tyres, where responsiveness is less important and where the fat tyres can soak up the road buzz.

Hope thats helpful.
Cheers
Hey!

Thanks for following up with more details about your ride experience. Your insights about the stiffness of the handlebars and vertical feedback up the seatpost are very helpful to keep in mind. As a potential buyer, these are the kinds of practical insights I'm interested in, so thanks for taking the time to share.

As you pointed out, it seems like the longer chainstays contribute to a different feel when putting the power down. But you're right, this design choice likely improves bike control, and it seems to work in that regard based on your point about the bike's predictability and handling.

It's interesting how different brands approach gravel bike design, isn't it? Canyon and Trek have their own takes with distinct models for racing and for more fun rides. It seems like Yoeleo is trying to strike a balance with the G21, and it's great to hear different perspectives on how well they've achieved that.

I'm looking forward to building up my G21 when it arrives. Your experience has given me a lot to think about as I plan my build, and I can't wait to share my thoughts and get feedback from the community. Thanks again for all your insights, and happy riding!

Cheers,

justkeepridin
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:08 am

by justkeepridin

NelsonUltraPBC wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2023 6:28 pm
Hello, how are you all?

I would like to talk about some of the benefits that I find in the Yoeleo G21 from the ultra-cycling position (particularly the competitive one).

I'd like to start with the geometry, an aggressive shape, the elongated chainstays allows more power, while the steering is reactive, something that is more akin to the handling of a CX bike. Fun but it is not designed for people who enjoy a relaxed ride and a geometry that is more aimed at comfort. With this I do not mean that it is not comfortable, the capacity to accommodate wheels of up to 53mm gives you a wide range to adjust the wheel size that best suits the terrain. Additionally, Yoeleo's Gravel-specific frame and wheelset combination absorb road vibrations very well. In particular, I have ridden it for more than 200km of mixed terrain without experiencing pain or discomfort typical of the discipline.

Another thing that I find advantageous about this particular model is the bike packing orientation. In the competitive ultradistance you want to be able to carry everything you need on the road in a compact way to make as few stops as possible and this bike fits everything. The space in the main triangle of the bicycle can accommodate 2 750ml bottles and a framebag of almost 5 liters, while I can carry two smaller bags, one on the down tube and another on the seat post, with the latter the opportunity moving on a rail the seat anchor allows you to find the best ratio between comfort and luggage efficiency. All this allows me to maintain the aerodynamics of the bike and carry all the necessary equipment (It should be mentioned that it is a size S or 52cm)

In addition, you have all the anchors to add the number of bags you want: 2 screws in the upper tube, 2 in the lower one, 8 in the fork and 4 more in the upper stay; so you could hang it up to the iron if you want. As I would summarize it is that you have the flexibility and space to choose the best configuration, according to the event and you will not ask for more space.

I have particularly enjoyed the overall experience of using the G21 for ultra-distance. It is a bike that feels fast, it is flexible to select the size of the wheels and the luggage options and that in a combination of frames and wheels you can ride comfortably for many KM.

I still have many KM to ride on this bike and I'm sure there's still a lot to discover, but those are the reasons that make me consider it a great option for ultra-distance riding.

My setup:

Yoeleo G21 S-52
Yoeleo Wheelset Gravel 35mm
38mm Teravail Tires
Shimano GXR 1x11 46, 11-42.
Fizik Argo Vento Carbon Seat

(Español)

Hola ¿Como están todos?

Me gustaría hablar de algunos de los beneficios que encuentro en la G21 de Yoeleo desde la postura del ultraciclismo (en particular el competitivo).

Me gustaría comenzar por la geometría, una forma agresiva, las vainas traceras alargadas permiten imprimir potencia, mientras que la dirección es reactiva, algo que se asemeja más al manejo de una bicicleta de CX. Divertida pero que no esta pensada para personas que disfrute de un paseo relajado y una geometría más bien dirigida a al comodidad. Con esto no quiero decir que no sea cómoda, la capacidad de albergar ruedos de hasta 53mm te da una amplia gama para ajustarte al tamaño de rueda que mejor se acomode al terreno. Adicionalmente la combinación re cuadro y rines específicos de Gravel de Yoeleo absorben las vibraciones del camino muy bien. En lo particular la he sacado a rodadas de mas de 200km de terreno mixto sin experimentar dolores o incomodidades propias de la disciplina.

Otro cosa que se me hace ventajosa de este modelo en particular es la orientación al bike packing. En la ultradistancia competitiva buscas poder llevar de manera compacta todo lo que necesitas en la ruta para hacer las menos paradas posibles y a esta bicicleta le cabe todo. Es espacio en el triangulo principal de la bicicleta puedo albergar 2 botellas de 750ml y una Framebag de casi 5 litros, mientras que puedo llevar dos bolsas más pequeñas, una el el tubo inferior y otra en el poste de asiento, de esta ultima la oportunidad de desplazar sobre un riel el anclaje del asiento te permite encontrar la mejor relación entre comodidad y eficiencia del equipaje. Todo esto me permite mantener la aerodinámica de la bicicleta y llevar todo el equipamiento necesario (Cabe mencionar que es una talla S o 52cm)

Adicioanlemte tienes todos los anclajes para sumar la cantidad de bolsas que quieras: 2 tornillos en el tubo superior, 2 en el inferior, 8 en la tijera y 4 más en la vaina superior; así que podrías colgarle hasta la plancha si así lo quieres. Como yo lo resumiría es que tiene la flexibilidad y el espacio para escoger la mejor configuración, según el evento y no vas a pedir mas espacio.

Particularmente he disfrutado mucho la experiencia general de usar la G21 para la ultra distancia. Es una bici que se siente veloz, es flexible para seleccionar el tamaño de las ruedas y las opciones de equipaje y que en combinación cuadros y rines lo puedes puedes andar de manera cómoda por muchos KM.

Aun me quedan muchos KM que recorrer sobre esta bicicleta y seguro aun mucho que descubrir pero esas son las razones que me hacen considerarla una gran opción para la ultra distancia.

Mi configuración:

Yoeleo G21 S-52
Yoeleo Wheelset Gravel 35mm
Cubiertas Teravail de 38mm
Shimano GXR 1x11 46, 11-42.
Asiento Fizik Argo Vento Carbon
Hey Nelson!

Thank you so much for sharing your experience with the Yoeleo G21. It's awesome to hear from someone using the bike for ultra-cycling - you've definitely given me a unique perspective!

I am a little bit confused what you're saying about the aggressive geometry, i think the frame have a good stifness and we can get the comfort from the tire size. The ability to use up to 53mm tires and the vibration handling sound like major pluses for those ultra-long rides.

And I have to say, I'm a bit jealous of your bikepacking setup. It seems like the G21 offers a ton of options to carry everything you need for long-distance races, which is a major factor I'm considering. Your setup with two 750ml bottles and a nearly 5-liter frame bag, not to mention the extra spots for bags on the down tube and seat post, sounds perfect. I'm definitely taking notes here!

I'd really love to see some pictures of your bike if you have any. And I'm curious, did you go with the integrated stem and handlebar, or the separate pieces? I'm leaning towards the separate stem and round handlebar because I want to add an aerobar for my long rides.

Again, I appreciate you sharing your insights - it's super helpful. Can't wait to hear more about your rides on the G21!

Cheers.

wickedsixx
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2021 7:50 am

by wickedsixx

justkeepridin wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 2:00 pm
Hey!

Thanks for following up with more details about your ride experience. Your insights about the stiffness of the handlebars and vertical feedback up the seatpost are very helpful to keep in mind. As a potential buyer, these are the kinds of practical insights I'm interested in, so thanks for taking the time to share.

As you pointed out, it seems like the longer chainstays contribute to a different feel when putting the power down. But you're right, this design choice likely improves bike control, and it seems to work in that regard based on your point about the bike's predictability and handling.

It's interesting how different brands approach gravel bike design, isn't it? Canyon and Trek have their own takes with distinct models for racing and for more fun rides. It seems like Yoeleo is trying to strike a balance with the G21, and it's great to hear different perspectives on how well they've achieved that.

I'm looking forward to building up my G21 when it arrives. Your experience has given me a lot to think about as I plan my build, and I can't wait to share my thoughts and get feedback from the community. Thanks again for all your insights, and happy riding!

Cheers,
I think you can compensate for the frames inability to soak up the rough stuff for sure, so if you're looking for a great bikepacking rig I'd say this got you covered.
As always with bikes you always need to consider the whole bike as a package and when it comes to custom building as in my case (I build all my bikes from the ground up) you need to take that into account.

I'm used to a particular way of setting up my road and gravel bikes that have come from many years of testing, building and riding. And sometimes you encounter something new which means you need to reorint yourself a bit. I think the G21 might be one of those odd cases for me. I'm used to performance oriented rigs and know perfectly well how to set those up, but as this is perhaps a little bit more oriented to some sort of middle-ground it's not a wonder I need to look at it with fresh eyes.

Make sure you have a pretty large cassette on the back and experiment with fatter tires, I think this frame might have been designed around 45+ tires in mind rather than what I'm used to (38-40c). I wish you all the best in your upcoming build :)

NelsonUltraPBC
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2023 12:13 am

by NelsonUltraPBC

wickedsixx wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2023 6:48 pm
justkeepridin wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 2:00 pm
Hey!

Thanks for following up with more details about your ride experience. Your insights about the stiffness of the handlebars and vertical feedback up the seatpost are very helpful to keep in mind. As a potential buyer, these are the kinds of practical insights I'm interested in, so thanks for taking the time to share.

As you pointed out, it seems like the longer chainstays contribute to a different feel when putting the power down. But you're right, this design choice likely improves bike control, and it seems to work in that regard based on your point about the bike's predictability and handling.

It's interesting how different brands approach gravel bike design, isn't it? Canyon and Trek have their own takes with distinct models for racing and for more fun rides. It seems like Yoeleo is trying to strike a balance with the G21, and it's great to hear different perspectives on how well they've achieved that.

I'm looking forward to building up my G21 when it arrives. Your experience has given me a lot to think about as I plan my build, and I can't wait to share my thoughts and get feedback from the community. Thanks again for all your insights, and happy riding!

Cheers,
I think you can compensate for the frames inability to soak up the rough stuff for sure, so if you're looking for a great bikepacking rig I'd say this got you covered.
As always with bikes you always need to consider the whole bike as a package and when it comes to custom building as in my case (I build all my bikes from the ground up) you need to take that into account.

I'm used to a particular way of setting up my road and gravel bikes that have come from many years of testing, building and riding. And sometimes you encounter something new which means you need to reorint yourself a bit. I think the G21 might be one of those odd cases for me. I'm used to performance oriented rigs and know perfectly well how to set those up, but as this is perhaps a little bit more oriented to some sort of middle-ground it's not a wonder I need to look at it with fresh eyes.

Make sure you have a pretty large cassette on the back and experiment with fatter tires, I think this frame might have been designed around 45+ tires in mind rather than what I'm used to (38-40c). I wish you all the best in your upcoming build :)
Hello how are you, it is interesting to see the different perspectives among users of the G21, but the reality is that I have to comment on some that seemed particularly different to me with respect to my experience on the G21, I am an ultra-distance cyclist, I don't know if it You know but these events are always looking for ways to test you and your bike and push you to the limit.

So far this bike has taken me through a very complete variety of terrain, from asphalt to single tracks with branches and stones up to 10cm, without any problem. In fact, quite the opposite, it is one of the most comfortable bikes I have ever used and I always choose 40 or smaller tires, currently I use the Teravail Washburn 700x38x35. And even with these tires and the aggressive position that I choose to take on the bike, any route is quite comfortable for me.

Perhaps something that I could suggest for you is selecting better support points, sometimes the correct seat and the correct selection of handlebar tape, pedals with a greater platform and of course complementing with a good bikefit can improve your comfort experience on the bike.

Just to finish I would like to say that if there is some orientation towards bike packing on the bike and that in my opinion is what makes it different, it has this balance that allows you to carry a lot of things and still keep the aerodynamics.

Ride Safe,

User avatar
Mr.Gib
Posts: 5259
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

A big problem with the Yoeleo G21 is that it is featured in a forum thread where a bunch of new members suddenly all appear at once and post lengthy and very lame "packaged" sounding reviews that completely lack any sense of an authentic customer experience. Unfortunately it is irrelevant whether or not these impressions are genuine or not. They just sound so fake that it makes me very suspicious of the Yoleo brand and in particular the G21, and would cause me to look elsewhere for a gravel bike.

See, this is what authentic sounds like.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

User avatar
LouisN
Posts: 3439
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:44 am
Location: Canada

by LouisN

:lol: :lol: Two thumbs up Mr. Gib :thumbup: .
(Their marketing could be good though, prices have gone up the roof for this brand !)

Louis :)

wickedsixx
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2021 7:50 am

by wickedsixx

Mr.Gib wrote:
Wed Jun 14, 2023 3:32 am
A big problem with the Yoeleo G21 is that it is featured in a forum thread where a bunch of new members suddenly all appear at once and post lengthy and very lame "packaged" sounding reviews that completely lack any sense of an authentic customer experience. Unfortunately it is irrelevant whether or not these impressions are genuine or not. They just sound so fake that it makes me very suspicious of the Yoleo brand and in particular the G21, and would cause me to look elsewhere for a gravel bike.

See, this is what authentic sounds like.
Spot on Mr Gib!
You managed to see through this completely AI generated content, the same AI that will eventually come back to hunt us all down. As a reward for your human-ness you're awarded with the state-of-the art tesla bot prototype infused with a beta version of GPT-5 with 1000x the data parameter-set as GPT 4! Sorry, couldn't help myself ;)

To be honest my first impression of this frame was very disappointing, to the extent that I contacted Wendy who was the salesperson who I had been in touch with and complained that something must have gone wrong at the production line.

The fact that all of us forum-newbies appear all at once is probably due to Yoeleos inability to supply people with their bikes in reasonable times. There was a bit of a surge of YouTubers promoting the G21 starting last summer, me and a whole lot of other people ended up throwing some orders in, 9 months later come this may/ june they finally got delivered, built and tested. For me it was a bit of a risk-taking, I've tried a few Chinese frames before, but mostly come to the conclusion that I prefer paying way more for an S-Works or a Time because it's just on another level. Still though, these frames are fairly inexpensive relatively and I see it as sort of a fun project, a bit of a hobby I can indulge in for living a simple life in all other regards.

So while your authenticity radar is blinking red, I'd say the easy answer to your concern really is just a matter of these conditions combined. Sure a lot of people who buy a bike such as this will be newbies with very little experience, but certainly not all of us. As for myself, riding bikes is my life basically, whenever I have free time I go on multiday gravel adventures or afterwork road fun alone or with friends. But I have no interest talking about it in forums usually. The only reason I wrote about this here was to give people some perspective about this frame since it only had very little reviews out there, and the few that I found were overwhelmingly positive. So with my pretty poor experience I reccon I could help people make an informed and balanced decision. Reality being I waited 9 months even though Yoeleo said it would be about 2-3months, then postponing it time and time again up until a point where I almost asked for a refund. I decided against it after digging a bit online when I found out this experience was very much a shared experience. I chose to wait a bit longer, and it finally arrived. I built it up, it all looked good, took it for a test 125km ride and was very, very disappointed. Have been experimenting a bit with the setup and now its better but still not close to the bigger brands I prefer to ride.

As for the discrepancies between different reviews, I wouldn't be too surprised if there's a big variation in QC between batches, mine certainly feels way to harsh for a comfortable gravel bike, but as I said, you can put 53c tyres on it. Ultimately for me though, it's not something I would recommend. I find it much wiser going for Light Carbon or something of the like which is substantially cheaper if price is the main concern, especially since the price has gone up 500USD since I ordered my G21.

So yeah, hopefully that's real enough for you buddy ;) As I say, I would look elsewhere as well unless you're like me and like to try things out and have fallen down the n+1 rabbit hole. For me, I love riding, building and fiddling around with bikes. So I'm half in it for the build experience, what can I say, I was brought up with legos and the rest is history... cheers

hansum
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2023 1:43 pm

by hansum

Hi, this might sound weird because its my first post, but I will try to be as authentic as possible to not sound like I might be AI generated :-)

I am one of those people, who likes to build stuff so they perfectly fit my personal need - especially when it comes to things that I will use a lot - and by alot I mean like almost daily and for 50+ hours a month.

I am a cyclist for maaaany years - started out with just riding mountainbikes for 10+ years, while transferring to also riding roadbikes and doing triathlon for about 5 years now, I also finally caught up with the gravel trend. I rode and built quite a few bikes up until now, by many brands in almost every material you can think of a frame could be made.

For my first gravel bike I started out with a no name brand regular aluminium road bike frame that I modified to fit 35c tires, a wider bar, better suited cassette for climbing and comfortable tubeless wheel setup etc. - it cost me about 800€ to make and it did its job.

As soon as I realized gravel riding is really fun and that I am able to ride long routes quite fast on any given surface, I thougt that I wanted more.

I am a big fan of electronic group sets - I love the way how they perform in any situation no matter what, they experience doesnt change its just always good and does whats it supposed to do even under heavy load. So I thought like ok I need an electronic groupset for my next bike.

Then I realized, ok my bike has to be really light, because I wanna go steep if needed - and I also like it to be agile and kinda lifely - just like a roadbike, but on any surface. So I thought ok, maybe a cyclocross is what I want, but idk I want at least 35mm or maybe even more!

I looked up some frameset that fit my need, but I couldnt find any below 3000€ - which was really kinda more money that I wanted to spend on a frame.

Well I dont know how but somehow an algorithm got me to the Yoeleo G21.

I liked how it looked, I liked the custom color option, I liked the weight, the carbon seatpost and integrated bars - it looked clean it looked fast and I also liked the price. I dont know why but I didnt bother alot for the geometry - I only thought like "hey 53c, mounting points everywhere, light frame, stack-to-reach quite sporty - sounds good".

So what did I do, I gave it a go. My mindset was, it doesnt have to be Specialized all the time - lets check out these chinese stuff.

Ordered custom painted with a good discount for about 1600€ for the frameset with bars and stem headset wahoo mount everything - waited 2 months and there it was.

Already got my DT Swiss rims and SRAM AXS groupset ready - built that thing up - was super impressed about how easy it was to get together, even the integrated handlebar where a piece of cake - just took me about 2 hours. getting the break calipers aligned, super easy - I thought like, very well done Yoeleo!

Put on some pedals, got tubeless set up and we are ready to go hop on the bike... BUT SUDDENLY... what is this? what the hell is this standover height?? that is VERY, VERY tight - like I guess I have never ridden a bike thats obviously my size where the top tube almost touched my crotch like that - so I thought like - idk thats weird, but I will get used to it. So I got in the saddle, first few pedal strokes and I was like "hmmm this is weird, it feels like there is NO LIFE at all in the rear...its just dead, nothing happening" - so I was like, idk maybe I just had too many hours on my roadbike. So I went for a few km and when it rolls it rolls - nothing special.

Then first few gravel sections again I was like "meh, thats odd... it feels like I am riding a 9bar 23mm tire over cobbles, whats going on here - its 45c with 2bar in it!" - really, the cockpit is something else - it is so damn harsh I never felt anything like it.

So I get up some hills - does its job, but again, nothing special - even though the whole setup is only 8,5kg it felt heavier.

Then the descent - I gotta say, thats really the thing where this bike shines - I think I rarely rode a bike that gives you so much confidence going down fast, even on gravel it feels very stable and would be perfect if it werent for the ultra stiff bars. I am a rider that rather goes fast uphill than downhill, but I had fun on this bike going downhill for sure.

Overall feeling still very disappointed.

So what are the lessons learned here?

Maybe do not blindly buy stuff that has almost none existend independed reviews and only because it looks good on paper.
I learned alot about how much geometry truly affects riding experience and performance.
1600€ is not cheap for how this frame performs.

What are the next steps - get a new topcap so I can use a regular stem and handlebar and hope it performs better.

If not, totally ditching this frame and live with the loss - my hands still hurt from the last ride.

Hope this helps anyone who considered buying it.

s3si1u
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2022 8:12 am

by s3si1u

This thread is hiliarious. :D

From the mainly negative reviews to the shilling from OP and the other dude. :D :D
Come on, Yoeleo.

by Weenie


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