Road Mini Pump

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wwnero
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2023 7:39 pm

by wwnero

da123 wrote:
Thu Feb 29, 2024 1:46 pm
ill principe wrote:
Thu Feb 29, 2024 10:30 am
da123 wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2024 2:39 pm
Flasher wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2024 12:46 pm
This one works well for me: https://bbbcycling.com/uk_en/bmp-50-samurai

They also have a very smart new one, although I've never used it! https://bbbcycling.com/uk_en/bmp-102-doubleshot
Highly recommend the doubleshot. It is tiny, but will comfortably inflate a road tire to decent pressure much quicker than any other 'micro' (i.e. fits in a jersey pocket or a small saddle bag without being visible) pump that I've ever used (and I've used quite a few).
Will the BBB Doubleshot work with a screw on tube valve extender? Or is the pump nozzle designed to match a presta head?
It is a Presta valve push on design
How do you find the push type design? Seems like it could be a bit cumbersome, especially at the higher pressures

naavt
Posts: 550
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:58 pm

by naavt

wwnero wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 8:45 pm

How do you find the push type design? Seems like it could be a bit cumbersome, especially at the higher pressures
I've just received mine a couple of hours ago and tested it right away. I'm pretty impressed and super happy with my decision.

I've taken 3min 30s to inflate a 25mm tire/tube combo in a 21mm internal width wheel to 60 psi, with 2 pauses in the process to check pressure with a topeak digital pressure gauge.

Only drawback is what you mention: the push on design which can be tricky at first when the tube has no air in it.

Not much effort and constant elbow grease until the end, at least to achieve 60 psi.

It has warmed up but not by much.

It weights 2g less than an Co2 + head :)

I'll post some pics today if I have the time

by Weenie


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da123
Posts: 506
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

naavt wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 9:23 pm
wwnero wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 8:45 pm

How do you find the push type design? Seems like it could be a bit cumbersome, especially at the higher pressures
I've just received mine a couple of hours ago and tested it right away. I'm pretty impressed and super happy with my decision.

I've taken 3min 30s to inflate a 25mm tire/tube combo in a 21mm internal width wheel to 60 psi, with 2 pauses in the process to check pressure with a topeak digital pressure gauge.

Only drawback is what you mention: the push on design which can be tricky at first when the tube has no air in it.

Not much effort and constant elbow grease until the end, at least to achieve 60 psi.

It has warmed up but not by much.

It weights 2g less than an Co2 + head :)

I'll post some pics today if I have the time
Glad you like it! It's a really clever design IMO. Very happy with mine too.

naavt
Posts: 550
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:58 pm

by naavt

Image

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naavt
Posts: 550
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:58 pm

by naavt

da123 wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 10:45 pm

Glad you like it! It's a really clever design IMO. Very happy with mine too.
Thanks for your tip. It was your initial post that first introduce me to this little pump which I dind't knew. :thumbup:

usr
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2021 5:58 pm

by usr

wwnero wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 8:45 pm
How do you find the push type design? Seems like it could be a bit cumbersome, especially at the higher pressures
Why would it be cumbersome at high pressures?

You just pick up the wheel, rotate it so that the valve is in the highest position and press on the pump. Then you just hold the pump and let gravity deal with the wheel. Roadbike emergency mini pumps are not for inflating tires while the wheel is attached to the rest of the bike. I usually take a little stroll while counting the strokes.

(Don't try this with a hose)

User avatar
ryanw
in the industry
Posts: 2290
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2016 6:52 pm
Location: London

by ryanw

Results after 150 pumps on a 20mm ID Enve 5.6 front wheel with a completely flat 25c tubeless tyre are as follows:

Lezyne Pocket Drive - 22psi
Topeak Micro Rocket Carbon - 24psi
Lezyne Road Drive - 27psi
Topeak Roadie TT Mini - 33psi
SL8 S-Works Project Black - 6.29kg
IG: RhinosWorkshop

wwnero
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2023 7:39 pm

by wwnero

usr wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 11:42 pm
wwnero wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 8:45 pm
How do you find the push type design? Seems like it could be a bit cumbersome, especially at the higher pressures
Why would it be cumbersome at high pressures?

You just pick up the wheel, rotate it so that the valve is in the highest position and press on the pump. Then you just hold the pump and let gravity deal with the wheel. Roadbike emergency mini pumps are not for inflating tires while the wheel is attached to the rest of the bike. I usually take a little stroll while counting the strokes.

(Don't try this with a hose)
It might just be my pump but i find once the pressure gets pretty high, i need to use my none pumping hand to really keep the pump stable so the valve stays straight especially at the bottom of the stroke to get that air into the tube. If on top of this i would need to ensure constant pressure on pump head pushing down against the presta valve, i could see that if you dont have a very firm grip on it keeping the entire valve straight and pushing the head down on the valve you may lose some air. Theres a reason most mini pumps have a head lock or is a twist lock.

I once tried to use a regular pump with a head like this bbb and found it very annoying to get a lot of pressure into the tire

usr
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2021 5:58 pm

by usr

But you don't actively push the pump head down on the valve, you hold the pump with the valve head's opening pointing up, and rest the valve down into that opening. Gravity does the pressing. The wheel does not touch the ground or the bike, it perches on the pump head, using the valve as its leg.

You certainly don't want the head end of the pump to vigorously jiggle around, stressing the valve, but some mild oscillation isn't all that bad when no other parts of the wheel touch anything but air. On the last, hard strokes I think I push the elbow of the head side arm to the hip bone, for stabilisation. But that's no careful extra diligence, it's something that just happens intuitively once you take the free floating wheel approach to roadside inflation.

Edit: even made a picture, because according to Google image search this is all secret knowledge, all advertisement shows people painfully curled in over their deflated wheels as if they were giving CPR. Just stand up, you're going through a routine fix, not through some panic nightmare:
The bottom of the wheel is not on the ground or on anything, the wheel just hangs there
The bottom of the wheel is not on the ground or on anything, the wheel just hangs there
Last edited by usr on Wed Mar 06, 2024 11:30 am, edited 2 times in total.

Brabus
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2021 3:25 pm

by Brabus

Prusoli wrote:
Fri Mar 01, 2024 8:44 pm
Brabus wrote:
Fri Mar 01, 2024 8:51 am
Prusoli wrote:
Thu Feb 29, 2024 6:28 pm
Topeak MICRO ROCKET CARBON is by far the lightest (55g) , and reliable. Fixed at my bottle cage it is quite discret. The only down side is the number of stroke to achieve 75 psi. I use it Twice a year max and have it for 9 years. Having 2 CO2 canister is heavier and not as secure (failure, multi flat...). When I do a sportive I sometimes add 1 CO2 canister in my pocket for quickier fix.
That''s my choice for my WW roadbike (6,4 kg with pedals, pomp, saddle bag and garmin mount)
For my gravel bike I prefer lezyne road drive S, besause of the high volume tire. Heavier (86g) but faster, and very reliable too.
Barbieri nana that i linked is 26grams...
DAmned, I missed that one,
I will consider it,
reliable ?
Just bought it , tried one time on home :)

bones
Posts: 422
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 10:38 am

by bones

naavt wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 10:54 pm
Image
Can you mount this pump next to a water bottle? How would that look?

naavt
Posts: 550
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:58 pm

by naavt

bones wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2024 5:46 am
naavt wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2024 10:54 pm
Image
Can you mount this pump next to a water bottle? How would that look?
Don't really know since it doesn't come with straps or any other mounting system to do that. I would be cautious though, once it's a two piece design that simply detaches one piece from another.

However, I can tell you that it fits on my Topeak Dynawedge Micro saddle bag (0,35L), with a Conti supersonic tube, 2 levers and a valve extension, which is perfect for me.

warthog101
Posts: 975
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 10:05 am

by warthog101

I like it due to the size. Straight in a jersey pocket for me.
What is it like to use? Pumps ok?

OtterSpace
Posts: 392
Joined: Sun Mar 08, 2020 6:28 am
Location: California Silicon Valley

by OtterSpace

I spent tons of time researching this last year. The BBB doubleshot is new to me but looks like an interesting mini pump performance, use ergonomics, and weight (83g posted above) in a stored micro size and therefore sounds interesting if you can accept the weight.

After researching and trying tons if you are trying to optimize weight, size, and performance first you have to think about what bike you are using the pump with.
1.jpg
If you need high PSI you need a mini pump or larger if not using CO2 unless you are fine inflating to like 60psi and riding home thinking of how awesome your ride could have been until you got an arm workout and had to head home instead on a limp tire. The mini pumps are generally over 80g. The best one I've tested in weight to performance is the lezyne carbon road drive HP but that one blurs the line between mini and micro size and the best performing ones are generally above 100g. I think the wider ones are better than the long ones for similar volume per stroke (man that sounds wrong) as well as easier storage.
2.jpg
Micro pump are inherently design compromises, on top of the mini design compromises, and tons of them are trash (I'm looking at you Topeak micro Rocket "carbon" which is actually metal with a removable carbon vanity sleve and is around 60g). With a micro pump you need to accept lower presure and will be pumping longer due to lower chamber volume which is just physics. Also while a directly connected mini pump is generally ergonomically fine it becomes a real pain at the micro size.
Capture.PNG
The best micro pump I've found is the iPump micro which has tons of good usability features for such a small pump. Its designer has more than a few screws loose and attacks his customers online but the product is very good if you accept the inherent compromises of a micro pump. The handle is quite nice for pumping with such a small pump and helps get to medium pressures so I'd avoid the lighter version. Micro designs where you have to pump with the head attached to the valve are also quite challenging ergonomically (barbieri nana)
3.jpg
I wish the crazy guy at iPump just made a version with a really wide chamber which added like 8g then micro pumps could compete in performance with mini pumps.

At the end of the day you have to wonder why there are so many mini and micro pump designs and there are a never ending string of new ones being released? Could it be that they are all design compromises??? No that couldn't be.

Dont even get me started on the trash jersey electronic pumps.

by Weenie


Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
Great Prices ✓    Broad Selection ✓    Worldwide Delivery ✓

www.starbike.com



usr
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2021 5:58 pm

by usr

OtterSpace wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2024 7:12 am
I think the wider ones are better than the long ones for similar volume per stroke (man that sounds wrong) as well as easier storage.
Depends on what pressure you consider sufficient to enjoy the rest of the ride. When you are somewhat old-school in tire taste and not very light, the wider ones will reach the point where you can't finish the stroke before reaching the pressure target.

That's the problem with multi-telescopic pumps: when the outer cylinder is narrow enough for high pressure, the inner cylinder is very low volume. And because physics dictate that the inner cylinder requires less force at a given pressure, it engages at the beginning of the stroke, leaving you to suffer through the high-pressure end of the stroke on the wider outer cylinder.

That's the problem BBB is trying to solve with the both the Samurai and the Doubleshot: The Samurai can lock the outer cylinder, allowing to convert it into a short but pressure-capable narrow pump at the high end of the inflation, and the Doubleshot avoids the problem entirely by making both cylinders exactly the same diameter, at the cost of higher storage volume.

If a company invented some clever mechanism to make the wider cylinder in a multi-telescopic pump engage before the narrow cylinder engages, so that every sub-stroke of the narrow cylinder starts with the generous air volume of the wider cylinder already compressed into the remaining volume, that company would be the undisputed king of minipumps forever (well, until the patent runs out)

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