Michelin Power Cup Clinchers

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The spirit of this board is to compile and organize wheels and tires related discussions.

If a new wheel tech is released, (say for example, TPU tubes, a brand new tire, or a new rim standard), feel free to start the discussion in the popular "Road". Your topic will eventually be moved here!

Will you ride off the edge and destroy your £10k bike?

Yes, they’re death traps
5
14%
Yes, if you run 25s and corner like Pidcock
6
16%
Yes, if you run 28s and corner like Pidcock
1
3%
No, for 99% of riders they’re fine
25
68%
 
Total votes: 37

Ferry
Posts: 172
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:47 pm
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
Contact:

by Ferry

I was also on the fence about the Michelins but decided to try them anyway. I have been on Vittoria Corsa, Veloflex and Turbo Cotton S (Hell of the North) the last two years. I have just mounted the tires on CLX 50 (21 mm internal) with Vittoria latex innertubes. The measure 29 mm (1 mm more than the Turbo Cotton S Hell of the North). I am riding these tomorrow and will let you know what I think of them.

Image

Ferry
Posts: 172
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:47 pm
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
Contact:

by Ferry

Only 100 kilometres done, but it's really simple: these roll fast. Yet less supple than the cotton clinchers I am used to.
No problems with grip either.

by Weenie


Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
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Mr.Gib
Posts: 5683
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

I don't trust these tires. Not in wet, not in dry. Very fast, very smooth and quiet rolling, but they feel quite squirrely on uneven surfaces. Like they deflect of road imperfections, worse in the wet. I'll post more detail in a few weeks - no time at present.

Here they are in action a few days ago. I thought I knew extreme conditions but this was nuts. (I should post in On the Road forum. The guy who took the photo is a genius and one hell of a rider)
Image.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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wheelbuilder
Posts: 1315
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:10 am

by wheelbuilder

Great iconic photo. Chapeau!
Never cheer before you know who is winning

alanyu
Posts: 1704
Joined: Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:10 pm

by alanyu

Mr.Gib wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2024 9:04 pm
I don't trust these tires. Not in wet, not in dry. Very fast, very smooth and quiet rolling, but they feel quite squirrely on uneven surfaces. Like they deflect of road imperfections, worse in the wet. I'll post more detail in a few weeks - no time at present.

Here they are in action a few days ago. I thought I knew extreme conditions but this was nuts. (I should post in On the Road forum. The guy who took the photo is a genius and one hell of a rider)
Image.
FurkaPass?

Greeners
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2024 10:13 am

by Greeners

I'm heading off to the Pyrenees with my new Power Cups in a few days. I'll be sure to add my findings.
So far only used the tyres locally prepping the bike, they feel very supple from what I can tell.

Sub2
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2023 4:50 pm

by Sub2

I've got a couple of hundred miles on my 28s, they roll well , comfortable and look the biz in tan and black 👌
Will def replace with same when the time comes.

User avatar
Mr.Gib
Posts: 5683
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

Mini update.

As the tires have worn I have become more at peace with them. I wonder if the issue was the factory finish. The thing that really raised my suspicions was riding over textured metal service covers in various towns, particularely in the wet. Now I know I am taliking about wet metal, but the tires would always slip down to the lowest point on the covers. So if a manhole cover had raised bumps, the tires would slip one way or the other if they tracked over a bump. At times I could feel the tires kick a couple of centimeters sideways. Fact is I have ridden over hundreds of such covers over the years on other tires and never had this experience. Also beware of wet wood bridges. The knots wear slower then the rest of the wood leaving little side slopes that can cause similar side-slipping. I recommend scuffing the full tread of the tires with sand paper before use. Perhaps that will help.

More later.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

MAJ
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:33 pm

by MAJ

ads wrote:Will i mash up my bike?
At the moment for me better than Continental GP5000 S TR



Enviado desde mi CPH2449 mediante Tapatalk


ads
Posts: 194
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2021 12:16 pm

by ads

I went with the 28mm TCs in the end and really like them. Can't see myself needing to switch whilst I'm still running tubes. Great tyres.

User avatar
Mr.Gib
Posts: 5683
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

And last words.

During one rainy ride I decided to conduct a non-scientific wet metal grip test. Standing beside the bike hands on the drops, with the front tire on a wet metal service cover, I tilted the bike at modest angle and pushed down on the front end while gradually increasing the angle. The Michelin Power Cup clinchers would offer momentary resistance and then completely release. Then I repeated the same test in the same spot with Mrs. Gib's bike with Vittoria Corsa Control 2.0. Clear difference - the Corsa had greater initial resistance and released more gradually. Repeated the test multiple times swapping back and forth between the two bikes. The difference was quite obvious, well beyond an "it's all in my head" thing. Of course such a test could have zero relevance to actual riding on tarmac.

Something else that I wonder about is if the Power Cups' profile is "pointier" and steeper sided then the Vittoria Corsa's that have worked for me in the past. The 28mm power cup occasionally rubs the underside of the rear brake bridge. 30mm Corsa Controls never did. I wonder if this different shape contributes the traction problems I have been noticing.

And a final data point. From the very first ride in the wet on the Power Cups, I noticed more rear wheel slippage that I can ever recall with other tires. In particular, if my rear tire rolled over a small stone, I would of course experience the initial slip that you would feel with any tire as the stone gets spat out, but with the Power Cups, the slipping would continue for a bit after the tire re-connected with the tarmac. Even Mrs. Gib noticed and commented.

That's about all I have on these tires. I fully expect that others will find these tires to be perfectly good. Perhaps in some applications under different riders they are excellent. Michelin knows rubber, and I'd be inclined to doubt my experience more than Michelin's expertise. It will be interesting to see what changes Michelin makes to the tire in future revisions. That may be quite telling about the true nature of the current tire. For example, if we see certain tread changes and marketing promises of "more cornering traction".
Last edited by Mr.Gib on Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:42 am, edited 4 times in total.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

CampagYOLO
Posts: 809
Joined: Thu May 06, 2021 3:58 pm

by CampagYOLO

Mr.Gib wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:36 am
And last words.

During one rainy ride I decided to conduct a non-scientific wet metal grip test. Standing beside the bike hands on the drops, with the front tire on a wet metal service cover, I tilted the bike at modest angle and pushed down on the front end while gradually increasing the angle. The Michelin Power Cup clinchers would offer momentary resistance and then completely release. Then I repeated the same test in the same spot with Mrs. Gib's bike with Vittoria Corsa Control 2.0. Clear difference - the Corsa had greater initial resistance and released more gradually. Repeated the test swapping back and forth between the two bikes. The difference was quite obvious, well beyond an "it's all in my head" thing. Of course such a test could have zero relevance to actual riding on tarmac.

Something else that I wonder about if the Power Cups profile is "pointier" and steeper sided then the Vittoria Corsa's that have worked for me in the past. The 28mm power cup occasionally rubs the underside of the rear brake bridge. 30mm Corsa Controls never did. I wonder if this different shape contributes the traction problems I have been noticing.

And a final data point. From the very first ride in the wet on the Power Cups, I noticed more rear wheel slippage that I can ever recall with other tires. In particular, if my rear tire rolled over a small stone, I would of course experience the initial slip that you would feel with any tire, but with the Power Cups, the slipping would continue for a bit after the tire re-connected with the tarmac. Even Mrs. Gib noticed and commented.

That's about all I have on these tires. I fully expect that others will find these tires to be perfectly good. Perhaps in some applications under different riders they are excellent. Michelin knows rubber, and I'd be inclined to doubt my experience more than Michelin's expertise. It will be interesting to see what changes Michelin makes to the tire in future revisions. That may be quite telling about the true nature of the current tire. For example, if we see certain tread changes and marketing promises of "more cornering traction".
Not sure how applicable it is but I've commuted on Michelin Power Gravel's in the past and they were sketchy as hell on cold wet tarmac despite being wide. Never experienced another tyre quite like it. So it could be something to do with the compounds they use.

I know they never test that well but Vittoria tyres do just feel better on the road when it comes to grip.

rudye9mr
Posts: 572
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 12:01 pm

by rudye9mr

@ Mr. Gib, what is the ambient temperature for your riding on these?

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Mr.Gib
Posts: 5683
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

rudye9mr wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2024 1:01 pm
@ Mr. Gib, what is the ambient temperature for your riding on these?
From 25 down to 5 Celcius
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

by Weenie


Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
Great Prices ✓    Broad Selection ✓    Worldwide Delivery ✓

www.starbike.com



rudye9mr
Posts: 572
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 12:01 pm

by rudye9mr

wondering if the compound needs heat to come alive...

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