Specialized brand

Discuss light weight issues concerning mountain bikes & parts.

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kik3sir
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2024 1:54 pm

by kik3sir

Hello,

I am going to apply to a job in order to work in a Specialized shop to sell bikes.

I am a pure road cyclist, I don't anything about MTB (litteraly anything), I don't know what makes a good MTB bike, what are the different type of suspensions, what are the current and ex specialized sponsored athlethes that are famous, etc.

They told me it's not necessary a problem. The job interview is next week and I'd like to gather MTP knowledge related to Specialized not to look like a fool in case this topic comes up.

What comes to your mind when I say MTB and Specialized ? Which athletes ? What bikes ? Have they done any kind of innovations lately ? Are they leading the market ?

Cheers!

by Weenie


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CrankAddictsRich
Posts: 2375
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 1:39 pm
Contact:

by CrankAddictsRich

MTB Crash course.

First off... there are several different classes of MTB that fall into 4 categories: XC (cross-country), Trail, Enduro and Downhill.

XC - usually characterized by shorter suspension travel and more aggressive geometry. These bikes tend to be light and excel at going uphill. The shorter suspension travel means that they don't squish as much when the rider is putting down power trying to climb. But that also means it can be a little dicey going downhill on agressive stuff. Specialized bikes that fit into this category: Epic and Epic Evo (in the specialized world, EVO means slightly more travel) also the hardtail mountain bikes like the Chisel and Rockhopper would fit into this category.

Trail - a step up in tavel length from the XC category, usually in the 130-150mm travel range. These bikes will kinf of fit into the sweet spot for most people neeeds... Enough suspension travel that they can absorb bigger hits and ride bigger features more easily, but still climb pretty well. the Specialized bikes that fit this category are the Stumpjumper and Stumpjump EVO. Also the hardtail Fuse, with more front travel is a trail hardtail.

Enduro - These bikes are the big brother to trail bikes... even more travel. They will go uphill, but you're starting to push more weight than really want to because Enduro bikes usually have 160-170mm travel and they start to get heavy. Additionally the geometry is slightly slacker with the front end pushed more forward. This makes climbing not so much fun, but wow will it go downhill like a monster and just eat up obstacles. The Specialized Enduro fits into this category, obviously. I had an enduro and wow that bike loved to go downhill and gobble up bumps.

Downhill - these bikes are specially designed to go downhill with no restraint. BIG suspension travel 180mm+. They do not want to be ridden uphill unless you absolutely have to. Usually these bikes are ridden at downhill specific parks where riders will chairlift to the top. The Specialized Demo is the downhill bike.

That should be a good starting point to at least understand the product from a starting point. Specialized has a really great instruction program called Specialized University where they will teach you about loads of product specifics and features.

Butcher
Shop Owner
Posts: 1952
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2010 4:58 am

by Butcher

Jeez....In my industry, if you have a pulse, you are hired.

Good luck. Selling bikes right now may be a tough job.

kik3sir
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2024 1:54 pm

by kik3sir

CrankAddictsRich wrote:
Sat May 25, 2024 11:38 am
MTB Crash course.

First off... there are several different classes of MTB that fall into 4 categories: XC (cross-country), Trail, Enduro and Downhill.

XC - usually characterized by shorter suspension travel and more aggressive geometry. These bikes tend to be light and excel at going uphill. The shorter suspension travel means that they don't squish as much when the rider is putting down power trying to climb. But that also means it can be a little dicey going downhill on agressive stuff. Specialized bikes that fit into this category: Epic and Epic Evo (in the specialized world, EVO means slightly more travel) also the hardtail mountain bikes like the Chisel and Rockhopper would fit into this category.

Trail - a step up in tavel length from the XC category, usually in the 130-150mm travel range. These bikes will kinf of fit into the sweet spot for most people neeeds... Enough suspension travel that they can absorb bigger hits and ride bigger features more easily, but still climb pretty well. the Specialized bikes that fit this category are the Stumpjumper and Stumpjump EVO. Also the hardtail Fuse, with more front travel is a trail hardtail.

Enduro - These bikes are the big brother to trail bikes... even more travel. They will go uphill, but you're starting to push more weight than really want to because Enduro bikes usually have 160-170mm travel and they start to get heavy. Additionally the geometry is slightly slacker with the front end pushed more forward. This makes climbing not so much fun, but wow will it go downhill like a monster and just eat up obstacles. The Specialized Enduro fits into this category, obviously. I had an enduro and wow that bike loved to go downhill and gobble up bumps.

Downhill - these bikes are specially designed to go downhill with no restraint. BIG suspension travel 180mm+. They do not want to be ridden uphill unless you absolutely have to. Usually these bikes are ridden at downhill specific parks where riders will chairlift to the top. The Specialized Demo is the downhill bike.

That should be a good starting point to at least understand the product from a starting point. Specialized has a really great instruction program called Specialized University where they will teach you about loads of product specifics and features.
Man... Thank you so much this is a gold mine!

Thanks a lot, I really appreciate it

hannawald
Posts: 1775
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:28 pm
Location: Czech Republic

by hannawald

I think if you look at the Specialized web site you get all the info:)
Epic is now brand new called Epic 8 (=8th generation)
Athletes which comes to my mind - olympic gold medal winner Jaroslav Kulhavy and Peter Sagan (who went from road to mtb). Victor Koretzky has some good results recently. They usually race in 2 disciplines, one is called short track and is super short and super intensive 20 min race and then there is Cross Country Olympic, longer race abou 1 and half hour. Everybody focus on Olympic games in Paris this year.
As the races are more and more technical, the geometry of XC bikes changes, they call it progressive geometry - seat tube is steeper and fork angle is slacker - so the geometry of XC bikes is now something like trail bikes some time ago. The bike is more capable going downhill, also modern XC bikes tend to have 120mm of travel and 3 lockout positions - open/close and something in between, pedal mode, due to this more travel is not a problem for efficiency. The latest tech is electronic suspension - Rock Shox Flight Attendant, which control the suspension characteristic and lock and the rider doesn´t have to do it manually. It is pretty expensive and only a feature on the best bikes which cost like a motorbike:) It adjusts the suspension according to the terrain, it can do it hundreds of time during an XC race, something you can´t do manually.
The growing popularity is definitely ebikes.
As for the groupsets, modern ones are 1x12 speed, Sram has electronic groupset not only for its best XX SL but it has already trickled down to cheaper lines, Shimano is only cable controled but everybody expect they will have something electronic this year.
Modern bikes have dropper seatposts, you can lower your seat while going downhill and lower easily the center of gravity.
XC bikes are now 29 inches and the rubber goes wider and wider, now the gold standard is 2,35 or 2,4 inches. Couple of years ago it was 2,2 inches. So if you look at the development, you see that even the fastest XC bikes segment went from hardtails to full suspension, from 100mm travel to 120mm travel, geometry has changed towards something which was a trail bike couple of years ago, tires went wider and seatposts went from rigid to dropper posts. Modern bikes are simply more and more capable. But it is still in the rider, modern bike gives you slightly more condidence but a good rider will still beat you on a rigid hardtail:)

Hexsense
Posts: 3366
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2015 12:41 am
Location: USA

by Hexsense

Type of suspension:
no suspension-> rely on flexy seat post ,frame and tires only.
Spring without damper-> mostly cheap stuff. But also think of Redshift ShockStop suspension stem.
Spring with damper -> most stuff you find on mtb.

To read further:
- What happen to bike geometry when you only have front suspension (hard tail, thus no rear suspension) when you put weight on the bike. And does that make you setup the bike fitting different from a full suspension?
- Coil vs air spring.
- spring curve, what is volume spacers, 2 vs 3 air chamber air spring
- In suspension setup, What is negative air chamber, what is sag and why most suspension have it. Then bonus point: how is Specialized Epic WC rear shock setup different from the rest.
- damper: what are HSC (high speed compression), LSC (low speed compression), HSR (high speed rebound), LSR (low speed rebound) and why other than downhill bike, you may not need all those knobs.
- what suspension setup mostly determine by rider weight, what suspension setup determine by ride aggressiveness and terrain.
- what are some common rear suspension design and why Specialized stop using horst link and just go all in on flex stay single pivot on recent bikes. (hint, it happened about when 2x go extinct on mtb)
- in term of suspension design: what are: anti squat, anti rise, leverage ratio, progression, pedal kick back. One good article from pinkbike might be all you need for this topic.
final test: you should be able to use Google translate and understand charts from
https://linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2023 ... 4.html?m=1
and compare its suspension objectively against their competitor
https://linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2019 ... 0.html?m=1
using just data from the chart.

aeroskii
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2023 9:13 pm

by aeroskii

kik3sir wrote:
Sat May 25, 2024 12:38 am
Hello,

I am going to apply to a job in order to work in a Specialized shop to sell bikes.

I am a pure road cyclist, I don't anything about MTB (litteraly anything), I don't know what makes a good MTB bike, what are the different type of suspensions, what are the current and ex specialized sponsored athlethes that are famous, etc.

They told me it's not necessary a problem. The job interview is next week and I'd like to gather MTP knowledge related to Specialized not to look like a fool in case this topic comes up.

What comes to your mind when I say MTB and Specialized ? Which athletes ? What bikes ? Have they done any kind of innovations lately ? Are they leading the market ?

Cheers!
I would just use chat gpt as it is very reliable for basic information. you could also just setup a playlist of a bunch of videos from the likes of gmbn or other youtubers and listen to them as you ride.

Greeners
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2024 10:13 am

by Greeners

A gap in your knowledge is sometimes preferable to a person that thinks they know it all from other employers or brands. If you are a blank canvas they can teach you what knowledge you may need & you will absorb the new brand info better. The fact you are a keen cyclist will help you get the job over someone that isn't.

I used to work in the cycle industry, once there was a new chap in our shop, he was from the motor trade (used to fit tyres & exhasts Kwikly), he made a remark as to why someone was cleaning their bike during a lunch hour, said person replied "if you have to ask that, you shouldn't be working here". A good point & not an issue one would expect to encounter if a cycling enthusiast was actually hired for the job (in a cycle shop).

spud
Posts: 1317
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:52 am

by spud

^ what a dueschy response. Too many cyclists have an insanely elitist, know-it-all attitude.

jfranci3
Posts: 1605
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:21 pm

by jfranci3

If you're taking to a company owned store, they just want someone who's super welcoming, can asks a few friendly questions ("what kind of riding do you do?", "where have you been riding?"), respond positively and extract more information ("I've been looking to ride up there, how are the trails?" "Those are great bikes; so versatile") , and remember their sales pitch. You don't need to know all bikes, just how to get people talking. If you're doing it right, there won't be any interview questions - just small talk that lasts 20min.

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LeDuke
Posts: 2053
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:39 am
Location: Front Range, CO

by LeDuke

If you aren’t interested in MTBs and don’t know anything about them, why sell them for a living?


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by Weenie


Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
Great Prices ✓    Broad Selection ✓    Worldwide Delivery ✓

www.starbike.com



stoney
Posts: 483
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:26 am

by stoney

I always despised going to one particular bike shop and ask them about a new Specialized product that just launched and the sales guy has no clue. I've just started ordering things online from Specialized directly instead of having this store order it.

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